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6. New Order

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With our sixth selection we had a bit of an internal debate. We were very tempted to merge the work of Joy Division and New Order to form one entry. There is a precedent for this as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame collectively inducted Parliament and Funkadelic but unlike the aforementioned Funk outfits, New Order began when Joy Division ended and their sounds were different enough to illicit separate entries.

Had Joy Division front man, Ian Curtis not have committed suicide, it is doubtful that New Order would have ever existed. Following that tragic loss, the remaining members formed a new band which to the surprise of many; was able to eclipse the success of its previous group and establish its place as one of the most critically acclaimed bands of the 1980’s. What New Order was able to accomplish was merge the Post Punk movement with Dance and Synth Pop which hadn’t been done before.  In 1983 they released the single, Blue Monday, which remains the highest selling 12 inch of all time; a song that could arguably be called one of the most important of the 80’s. They certainly have the history, the influence, the critical acclaim and talent to be Hall worthy. If an electronic driven band is to get in the Hall, New Order could be its best shot.
  

New Order

 

 

The Bullet Points:

 

Previous Rank:

2010: #5

 

Eligible Since:

2006

  

Country of Origin:

United Kingdom (Manchester, England)

 

Why They Will Get In:

One of the key players in the 80’s alt scene and has a secured spot in music history.

  

Why They Won’t Get In:

A vote for New Order does not induct Ian Curtis.

 

Nominated In:

Never

  

Essential Albums:

Power, Corruption & Lies (1983)

Lowlife (1985)

Brotherhood (1986)

Republic (1993)

 

Our Five Favorite Songs as Chosen by Each Member of the NIHOF Committee:

Blue Monday (Single, 1983)

Age of Consent (From Power, Corruption & Lies, 1983)

Thieves Like Us (Single, 1984)

Bizarre Love Triangle (From Brotherhood, 1986)

Round & Round (From Technique, 1989)

 

 

 

www.neworder.cc

 

Should New Order be in the Hall of Fame?

(You must be registered and logged in to vote!)
Definitely put them in! - 36.4%
Maybe, but others deserve it first. - 33.3%
Probably not, but it wouldn't be the end of the world. - 9.1%
No opinion. - 6.1%
No way! - 15.2%
Last modified on Saturday, 01 February 2014 12:32

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Comments   

 
0 #1 Sean -0001-11-29 19:00
I'd induct them as part of a Joy Division/New Order double bill. Ian Curtis is legendary in Britain, but New Order had far greater longevity than Joy Division did. Even though New Order's sound was different from Joy Division's, I'd say the two bands' sounds were similar enough that this would be even more justifiable than the Small Faces/Faces nomination on the ballot this time. After all, there are artists that I'd say changed their sound far more than these guys did who didn't change their name (Beatles, Bowie, Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd, Zappa among others) so why should these guys get snubbed because they changed their name? Joy Division's "Love Will Tear Us Apart" was already beginning to point in the New Order direction...As far as synthpop is concerned, I expect to see Kraftwerk and Depeche Mode inducted first, as deserving as these guys are. That's assuming the hall is interested in electronic rock at all, which they might not be (the prog-rock bands were the ones who started using synthesizers, and most of them are being snubbed too).
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+2 #2 egotript -0001-11-29 19:00
Best. Band. Ever.
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-9 #3 Smokestoomuch -0001-11-29 19:00
Music to grind your teeth. I've been a rock fan for 45 years and never heard of them.
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0 #4 Spheniscus 2012-08-06 21:52
If you can only take one, take New Order. But their exhibit in the Museum section of the Hall is a joint exhibit. So if a Small Faces/Faces combo is what is needed to get them in, then I'm all for it.
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0 #5 Mr.Crowley 2012-10-29 16:58
It should be combined as Joy Division/New Order I think -- to honor the genius of Ian and to show how the band transformed following his suicide into the premiere new wave/synth pop band with genuine punk integrity. Joy Division have (IMHO) the greatest rock song of all time in "Love will tear us apart." Perfection. And New Order, following their idols Kraftwerk, used synths with brilliance and poetry.

Smokestoomuch, if you have never heard of them, you missed the 70s and 80s, not to mention the spectacular film Control, out a few years ago. Highly recommended for any rock fan.
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-4 #6 Reboot Needed 2012-12-21 18:58
Seriously? This band is #6 on the list while Rush only just got in a few days ago and bands like Chicago, Yes, Deep Purple, and Jethro Tull are still out there uninducted?

Too many people haven't even heard of New Order. They are no way as significant as the aforementioned acts.
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-2 #7 What 2013-04-13 14:19
Who are Yes, Deep Purple and Jethro Tull? I can't name one of their songs. Those bands aren't significant at all. But, I know a bunch of people who know New Order and many acts who have been influenced by them.
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+5 #8 kookoo 2013-05-12 00:51
Not knowing who New Order or Joy Division are hardly makes you clever. These are outstanding bands and would make a fantastic double induction.
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0 #9 biograph 2013-05-12 04:12
Joy Division is one of those rare bands you don't want the execs behind the RnRHoF to soil by association. It's like if Disney bought the Joy Division catalog. Sure, Disney will one day own The Beatles, Zeppelin, the Stones, U2, etc., but -- Joy Division?!? We need to leave something pure.

That all said, if it must be done, induct Joy Division and New Order together. It'll hurt less.
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